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Spinal Decompression: How It Works and Its Benefits In our youth, the discs between each of our vertebrae are packed with water, meaning we are practically floating along through the day on a bed of fluid. When we get older, our discs start to lose fluid, usually leading to height loss and more jarring movements. We also tend to more jarringly Our movements also become less more jarring, and alas! The height loss is because of the lowered concentrations of proteoglycans, or proteins in the discs that attract water through osmosis. Continual spinal loading considerably reduces proteoglycan synthesis rates, and we typically load our spines by sitting for hours and hours. Sitting also expels fluid from the discs, and, at the same time, makes it harder to get fresh fluid in. Because of this, the lumbar area is where our discs get the thinnest as we age. Declining proteoglycan concentration is one of the initial indications of disc degeneration. It can lead to disc thinning at a single spinal level over time.
A Quick Overlook of Experts – Your Cheatsheet
Disruption of the negative effects of spinal loading is among the benefits of daily decompression. The therapy’s ability to restore height lost due to disc degeneration is still to be established however.
A Quick Overlook of Experts – Your Cheatsheet
Day to day, about 20% of our discal fluid is because of two key factors – the weighing down effect of gravity, and spinal compression from muscular activity. Small studies done on football players, whose heights were measured before and after a game, indicated that height loss due to spinal decompression can be recouped. When we sit for a long time, more fluid is lost from our lumbar spines because this portion of the body has higher intra-discal pressure. When we sit for two hours straight – a position in which our discs are compressed – around 10% of discal fluid is squeezed out; lumbar decompression solves the problem by helping put the fluid back in. According to research, fluid lost due to excessive spinal loading (for instance, lifting a ten-kilo barbell) can be offset by lying on supine position with the legs bent at the knees. Additionally, it was discovered that a bent back (kyphosis) causes more discal fluid loss than an arched (lordotic) one. Spinal decompression (traction) is useful for both acute and chronic conditions, but its benefits work in different ways. In acute pain, traction provides relief by stretching the muscles out of over-protective mode, and that helps the fluid collection around the joints to leak. In chronic conditions, traction stretches the super strong and fibrous disc walls, allowing the discs to attract more fluid, and prevents disc degeneration. Finally, take note that discs are sacks filled with water. Nutrient-filled fluid enters as you pull them apart, which means the discs are not only able to avoid degeneration, but they help with repair processes too.